You are Never too old to Follow your Dream to the Finish Line

Posted by martin.parnell |
You are Never too old to Follow your Dream to the Finish Line

Anyone who knows me will attest to the fact that I am a little partial to running the odd marathon. Therefore, I was intrigued to read an article from CBC Edmonton’s Wallis Snowden, about Roger MacMillan, (photo credit) from Fort Saskatchewan. Roger celebrated his upcoming 80th Birthday, by running his 100th Marathon, in Edmonton, on August 20th. 

Not only do I admire him for reaching this milestone, but mostly for his attitude towards running and keeping active, particularly in later life. Roger completed his first full race at the age of 69 and has since completed several “big ones” including New York, and Dublin. 

It was then that he set himself a target of running 100 marathons before his 80th Birthday, which is on October 30th this year.  “Don't win the race, just finish it. You have to take it easy. I'm not a racer," Macmillan said in an interview with CBC Radio's Edmonton AM. 

Like me, he hadn’t really considered running, until something triggered his desire to run his first race.

In 2002, I was 47 and had never been a runner. However, I accepted a challenge from my younger brother, to run the Calgary marathon. My first run was 1km out from my house and 1km back. It was not a good experience and I realized I needed support and advice. So I joined a local running club and had soon completed my first 10km race.

For Roger, it was watching the achievements of a co-worker. "I was working at an office up in Fort McMurray and a guy kept coming in to work with running T-shirts on and I wanted one," Macmillan said with a chuckle.

"I entered a 10K race in Edmonton and I got my T-shirt. I couldn't walk for about a week, but I was hooked."

Macmillan wore bib number 100 when his children and grandchildren gathered to watch him cross the finish line at the Edmonton Marathon.

His message is clear and he advises other seniors to stay spry “a body in motion stays in motion.” he says, adding “you don't necessarily have to run marathons, but keep moving."

He’s absolutely right. You don’t have to take up running, a good walk will reap benefits for anyone, of any age.

Macmillan walks every day, 365 days a year because, as he says, “You’ve got to keep moving and hopefully live a little bit longer."

I knew he was a man after my own heart when I read that:

1. He took up running later in life.

2. He sets himself goals.

3. He tries to send a message about keeping active.

4. He knows that it’s not about winning, but the taking part.

Also, that this ex-pat celebrated after the big race with a nice cold pint of Guinness, which is precisely what I do, after all of my marathons and Ultra-marathons.

Cheers to you, Roger, a true inspiration.

comments powered by Disqus