From Bins to Strategies, How to Accept Change in the Workplace

Posted by martin.parnell |
From Bins to Strategies, How to Accept Change in the Workplace

Last Friday, on returning home from a meeting, I found a new, large, green bin had been deposited on my driveway. It’s for recycling organic, compostable materials.I knew it was coming, but wasn’t sure when.  My first reaction was “Where am I going to put it? “I have to confess, initially I saw it as a bit of a hassle. It came with a booklet about what I can put in it, what bags I have to use, remembering what goes in it, when to put it out  to be emptied etc.

I had to make myself focus on the positive side of having an extra bin.

Of course, I know it makes sense, why put all that stuff in the landfill, when it can be made into compost? I thought too about friends who have been composting for some time and manage it all very well. I guess all of us occasionally take time to adjust to change, even when it’s a small one. It can also be true of changes in the workplace. Some people find it difficult to adapt to change.

On the Jostle Blog website, I found an item posted by Bev Attfield in Connected Companies, Clarity, entitled 6 steps for introducing technology into the workplace.

In it, Bev address one issue that can be particularly daunting for some employees and that’s when new technology is introduced. She states that:

“People don’t like change. That’s especially evident inside the workplace, particularly when it comes to technology. While some people see the immediate value of adopting new technology, many don't. Perhaps it’s the perceived difficulty of implementing a new way of working, or maybe the benefits haven’t been clearly articulated. Regardless, it’s important to carefully plan how a new technology is implemented.”

Bev then gives us 6 tips to help the process of introducing new technology:

  1. Make sure it’s something everyone, not just you, will benefit from. Be diligent and remain objective. Is this something that’ll really benefit your staff, teams, and organization? Or does it just seem like the right idea to meet your immediate needs?
  1. Give everyone a heads up. Communicate as soon as possible that you’re investigating a new technology and outline the benefits and impact for all. Be open about how it supports and aligns with business objectives. Involve key stakeholders early to get buy in and identify problems. 
  1. Engage a champion (or a few). Negativity can spread easily in the workplace. Enlist a few people at all levels to help others understand the benefits of the new technology. Show your champions the clear advantages and intended outcomes of the new solution so that they can easily vocalize and demonstrate their support. Make sure your full senior leadership team is behind the change and will function as champions themselves.
  1. Provide engaging launch and training events. No one wants to sit through a boring training session. If it’s done effectively, your participants won’t even realize they’re learning (or being asked to change). Try a lunch and learn or throw some humor into your presentation, and make your launch a celebration. Do what works best for your people and workplace culture. 
  1. Consider different learning styles and needs. Whether we’re an auditory, visual, or a kinesthetic learner, we all absorb information differently. Tailor your training sessions to all types of learners by providing a range of learning materials and options such as documents, live training, and videos. Be available for one-on-one training for those that require that extra bit of personal help.
  1. Make it personal. Nothing builds apathy more than employees not recognizing the personal value of a new tool. Let people know why this matters to them, and how it will impact their day-to-day work. Ensure staff understand how it will help them, not just the company. Make sure your new technology is ready to use and seeded with relevant data for all users. Help them quickly get more value out of the new system than the effort they are investing in it.”


These are all very useful ideas to consider, not just when introducing new technology, but any new ideas, strategies, resources and even that new recycling bin in the lunch room!

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